Category Archives: winter greens

2018 CSA Winter February 10th Solar

2018 CSA Winter February 10th Solar

Solar energy at the farm creates all the plant growth and now provides some of our electrical needs.

  • Arugula 10×10
  • Salad Mix 10×10
  • Chervil
  • Thai Basil Box
  • Sage
  • Rosemary
  • Poultry Herb Mix
  • Micro Collards
  • Micro Cilantro
  • Fresh Eggs

Some of you may have already seen parts of the progress we have been making on building steel frames and installing solar panels here at the farm, but for those who haven’t seen the photos, check out these thus far. Soon I will report back with up-to-date photos to show how Michael has taken it a step further.

This greenhouse here, in the photo above, just behind Michael, now has a rain collection system installed all around it so that the water can be captured for use (after filtering, testing, sanitizing, etc) while also helping to prevent erosion and flooding in the fields that are past this greenhouse and down the hill.

In addition to these improvement towards sustainability and stewardship here at the farm, the solar array is growing bit by bit when the weather is right for welding, we’re not getting stuck in the mud, and time allows. Three rows of ten now rest in an angular nest of steel that will take two more rows before completion.

Much gratitude for all your support over the years! Make it a great week

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2018 CSA Winter February 3rd Winter Greens

2018 CSA Winter February 3rd Winter Greens

  • Kale 10×10
  • Salad Mix 10×10
  • Chervil
  • Thai Basil Box
  • Sage
  • Red Sorrel
  • Green Sorrel
  • Microgreens

Winter greens: Sorrel is a leaf vegetable that is tart and tangy. This green can be eaten raw or cooked. Worldwide it can be found as the main ingredient in sorrel soups, served warm or chilled. There are curry recipes that include sorrel. It is very popular to combine with cream as a sauce. A simple sauce can be made to top off fish, chicken, potatoes, and other veggies. Here is a simple recipe to make use of all of your sorrel and ½ a cup of cream. Heat a skillet and melt butter. Chop your sorrel as large or as fine as you like and add to heat, just wilting the leaves. Pour in your cream and when it approaches a boil, reduce until the cream sauce coats the back of a spoon. Slather this on your cooked meat or veggies. Sorrel makes a yummy pesto which is also great for fish and potatoes. More rare are recipes combining fruits such as strawberries or peaches with sorrel. It adds a punch to smoothies and is a welcome addition to salads. I like to cut it into a salad of apples with nuts. When the peaches come, I want to try a recipe suggestion from whiteonricecouple.com: peach and sorrel salad, which is torn sorrel leaves topped with peaches and dressed with a vinaigrette salad dressing of honey, grapeseed oil, balsamic vinegar and vanilla. Yum!

Our sorrel won in an international cooking competition when the Inn at Little Washington took it to France with them. We hope you will enjoy a little extra zing this week in your meal preparations! Bon appétit!

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2018 CSA Winter January 27th

2018 CSA Winter January 27th

  • Arugula 10×10
  • Thai Basil Box
  • Poultry Herb Mix
  • Parsley
  • Beet Greens
  • Papaya
  • Dozen Eggs
  • Micro Cilantro
  • Micro Celery

SPECIAL BONUS! This week with the addition of a dozen of our colorful and delicious eggs! Did you know that our chickens eat most of what we grow here, too? Cuttings, culls and damaged produce are a treat for our birds. Your eggs can be used to whip up a frittata (as presented by Ms. Patti Rowe at above right) or a quiche or omelette, or try them scrambled, any of which would pair nicely with the arugula. For a quiche, I use a nine-inch shell, layer in the arugula, chopped bite sized, and grated cheese (try a sharp white cheddar), and beaten eggs (6-9). You can add a dash of milk, salt and pepper, a dollop of pesto or smoked paprika, etc, to your liking. But really, DO try the eggs and the arugula together. It is as simple as scrambling some eggs, then towards the last 2-3 minutes, scissor cut the arugula in bite sized cuts right into the pan with your scramble. Continue turning the eggs over and over the arugula to steam it a bit. When the eggs are done, you might like a grating of cheese as a garnish. If grated right into the pan, it can then be covered with a lid, (fire has been turned off), to melt over the top.    

 

There is one short cut that I enjoy in the kitchen when time is short: pre-formed pie crusts. They can be purchased already pressed into a pan and trimmed, usually in the frozen foods department. Or try my favorites, pie crust dough that comes rolled up. These are nice as I can shape them however I want in whatever dish or pan. I have used these to make mini papaya pies inside the cups of a cupcake pan, using a goblet to cut the pastry dough into smaller circles. Remaining dough can be kneaded back together and rolled out to cut a few more rounds. 

 

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