Category Archives: Sorrel

CSA_10_21_17

2017 CSA Fall October 21, 2017 Sorrel Winter Squash Peppers

Sorrel Winter Squash Peppers

Sorrel is a leaf vegetable that is tart and tangy. This green can be eaten raw or cooked. Worldwide it can be found as the main ingredient in sorrel soups, served warm or chilled. There are curry recipes that include sorrel. It is very popular to combine with cream as a sauce. A simple sauce can be made to top off fish, chicken, potatoes, and other veggies. Here is a simple recipe to make use of all of your sorrel and ½ a cup of cream. Heat a skillet and melt butter. Chop your sorrel as large or as fine as you like and add to heat, just wilting the leaves. Pour in your cream and when it approaches a boil, reduce until the cream sauce coats the back of a spoon. Slather this on your cooked meat or veggies. Sorrel makes a yummy pesto which is also great for fish and potatoes. The onions included in your share this week go well as a pan roasted start for soup and you can utilize your garlic by making pesto. Try combining sorrel sauce with a garnish of sliced tomatoes for a nice twist. More rare are recipes combining fruits such as strawberries or peaches with sorrel. It adds a punch to smoothies and is a welcome addition to salads. I like to cut it into a salad of apples with nuts. When the peaches come, I want to try a recipe suggestion from whiteonricecouple.com: peach and sorrel salad, which is torn sorrel leaves topped with peaches and dressed with a vinaigrette salad dressing of honey, grapeseed oil, balsamic vinegar and vanilla. Yum!
Our sorrel won in an international cooking competition when the Inn at Little Washington took it to France with them. We hope you will enjoy a little extra zing this week in your meal preparations! Bon appétit!

2017CSA_Fall_Oct_21

 

Burgundy Okra

2016 CSA Summer September 3rd Okra

2016 CSA Summer September 3rd Okra

  • Bell Peppers
  • Eggplant
  • Okra
  • Green Beans
  • Flowering Mint
  • Flowering Thai Basil
  • Yellow Squash
  • Gold Bar Zucchini
  • Tomatoes
  • Gourmet Cucumber
  • Patty Pan Squash
  • Sorrel bunch
  • Beet tops bunch

We are Hiring Farm Manager and Labor –

Michael wanted to highlight some flowering herbs this week as they are often overlooked in the garden by folks but the chefs love them! Both the thai basil and the mint flowers go great with deserts, infusions, muddled drinks and as a syrup. Try just breaking them up over vanilla ice cream for a really easy after dinner treat. The thai basil flowers will pop off of the stem if you lightly pinch at the bottom and run your fingers upward. For people that make their own cough or throat syrup, the flowers are a handy flavoring, adding sweetness. I like to make a simple syrup with sugar and water, infusing the flowers, and using this in mixed drinks, lemonade, teas, sorbets and over deserts or in yogurt. It makes an impression at the bar when pouring for friends.  To make a simple syrup combine equal parts water and sugar then dissolve with heat on the stove. Turn the heat off and add your flowery parts (and leaf is ok, too) and let the liquid cool for an hour. Strain into a container to enjoy the rich flavor as a condiment.

Don’t forget to pick up tomatoes from us as part of your CSA share this week. We like to keep them at a different temperature so they are flavorful when they get to you. To your health and your pleasure!

Burgundy Okra

Burgundy Okra

Thai Basil Flowers

Thai Basil Flowers

 

2016CSA_Summer_Sept_3
Sorrel

2016 CSA Summer July 2nd

2016 CSA Summer July 2nd

  • Sorrel
  • Field Arugula
  • Mixed Field Greens
  • Squash Blossoms
  • Spring Onions
  • Garlic bunch
  • Poultry Herbs
  • Gold Zucchini
  • New Potatoes
  • Tomatoes

2016 CSA Summer July 2nd: Sorrel

Sorrel is a leaf vegetable that is tart and tangy. This green can be eaten raw or cooked. Worldwide it can be found as the main ingredient in sorrel soups, served warm or chilled. There are curry recipes that include sorrel. It is very popular to combine with cream as a sauce.  A simple sauce can be made to top off fish, chicken, potatoes, and other veggies. Here is a simple recipe to make use of all of your sorrel and ½ a cup of cream. Heat a skillet and melt butter. Chop your sorrel as large or as fine as you like and add to heat, just wilting the leaves. Pour in your cream and when it approaches a boil, reduce until the cream sauce coats the back of a spoon. Slather this on your cooked meat or veggies. Sorrel makes a yummy pesto which is also great for fish and potatoes. The onions included in your share this week go well as a pan roasted start for soup and you can utilize your garlic by making pesto. Try combining sorrel sauce with a garnish of sliced tomatoes for a nice twist. More rare are recipes combining fruits such as strawberries or peaches with sorrel. It adds a punch to smoothies and is a welcome addition to salads. I like to cut it into a salad of apples with nuts. When the peaches come, I want to try a recipe suggestion from whiteonricecouple.com: peach and sorrel salad, which is torn sorrel leaves topped with peaches and dressed with a vinaigrette salad dressing of honey, grapeseed oil, balsamic vinegar and vanilla. Yum!

Our sorrel won in an international cooking competition when the Inn at Little Washington took it to France with them. We hope you will enjoy a little extra zing this week in your meal preparations! Bon appétit!

2016CSA_Summer_Jul_2