Category Archives: CSADist

2018 CSA Winter March 10th wind storm

2018 CSA Winter March 10th wind storm

  • Ginger
  • Turmeric
  • Beet Tops bunch
  • Mix of Citrus
  • Salad Mix 10×10
  • Baby Arugula box
  • Poultry Herb mix
  • Microgreens
  • Papaya
  • Eggs

My apologies for missing a post last weekend but as you can see above, the 70 mph sustained gusts in the wind storm kept us busy with crisis management. Last week’s offerings were kale, baby salad mix, papaya, micros, sage, rosemary, poultry herbs, and 2 dozen eggs. First picture, below left, are Calamondin oranges, plus a few Thai limes. Below that, left, are kumquats still on the tree. These are an almost egg-shaped citrus which we usually eat whole, raw, or sliced up to garnish a salad or dish. These have a mild and sweet flavor, in contrast to the Calamondin which are thin skinned and very tart. Those I like to scissor cut broadly over a salad, including the skin, or add to a homemade dressing. These are great for accentuating the cooking of meats, stir-fry, sweet and sours, curries, and deserts, esp. fruit pies. Makes for a great marmalade or syrup for the table. For a quick, on-the-go energizer, try scissor cutting into your cup of tea or your water bottle. The rind will continue to release flavor for a refill. The Thai (or Makrut) limes are larger, have a bumpier look to the thick skin, and have a raised neck where it was attached. Although there is a bit of flesh and juice in the center, it is the skin that is most often used in cooking to impart its flavor to the likes of Pan-Pacific foods by way of a dash of zest. I store mine in the freezer, taking it out to grate a bit and returning for long term storage! Enjoy

2018CSA_Winter_Mar_9

2018 CSA Winter February 24th Citrus

2018 CSA Winter February 24th Citrus

  • Eggs
  • Mix of Citrus
  • Salad Mix 10×10
  • Baby Salad Mix
  • Dill
  • Pesto
  • Microgreens
  • Poultry Herb Blend

A mix of citrus, eggs and a container of freshly made pesto this week along with your greens and herbs in your CSA share this week! Pictured at right above are Calamondin oranges, and in the bowl here to the right are those plus a few Thai limes. Below left are kumquats still on the tree. These are an almost egg-shaped citrus which we usually eat whole, raw, or sliced up to garnish a salad or dish. These have a mild and sweet flavor, in contrast to the Calamondin which are thin skinned and very tart. Those I like to scissor cut broadly over a salad, including the skin, or adding to a homemade dressing. These are great for accentuating the cooking of meats, stir-fry, sweet and sours, curries, deserts, especially fruit pies. Makes for a great marmalade or syrup for the table. For a quick, on-the-go energizer try scissor cutting into your cup of tea or your water bottle. The rind will continue to release some flavor for a refill. The Thai (or Makrut) limes are larger, have a more bumpy look to the thick skin, and have a raised neck where it was attached. Although there is a bit of flesh and juice in the center, it is the skin that is most often used in cooking to impart its flavor to the likes of Pan-Pacific foods by way of a dash of zest. I store mine in the freezer, taking it out to grate a bit and returning for long term storage! Enjoy!

2018CSA_Winter_Feb_24

Citrus

Kumquats and Calamondin

Kumquats and Calamondin

Thai Lime PonderosaThai Lime- Ponderosa lemon- Kumquat- Calamondin

Thai Lime- Ponderosa lemon- Kumquat- Calamondin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Calamondin

    – tart seeded completely edible skin – crush into drinks use in extracts and cooking squat or dimpled fruit

  • Kumquat

    – sweet no or few seeds and completely edible peel – consume whole like candy slick firm oval fruits

  • Thai lime

    – 1000x the potentcyof Lime Leaf – little juice zest of peel powerfull in curries, green teardrop shape

  • Ponderosa Lemon

    – thick skin huge lemons

collards

2018 CSA Winter February 17th Collards

2018 CSA Winter February 17th Collards

  • Eggs
  • Papaya
  • Arugula 10×10
  • Kale 10×10
  • Chervil
  • Sage
  • Collard Bunch
  • Poultry Herb Mix
  • Microgreens

A new take on eating collard greens:  Crazy Cajun wraps…Baba Yaga rolls…whatever you call them, they are an easy and quick way to enjoy your collards this week.  We took grated ginger, ham, onion, sweet peppers & cardamom,  sprinkled this chopped blend with balsamic then wrapped this in a collard leaf and fastened it with a toothpick. Finished by pouring olive oil around and over top a bit…cooked for 15 mins @ 350…then sat for 5 in cooling oven. The collard bunch can also be chopped up for a classic southern dish…fry up some onion in butter, add water (and a meat, such as ham or bacon, Virginia style, or you can use leftover bone like we did in Louisiana. Cook in your pot; add seasoning if you like, and put in your chopped collards. Cover and cook until tender. Personally, i do not prefer over-cooking as is custom. The timing is up to you .

Yummy and nutritious bonuses this week in papaya and a dozen eggs. We like the papaya cubed and dressed in lime juice, which is a traditional approach. Having the eggs included with arugula makes easily one of my favorite combos…try it added to your scrambled eggs this week! Enjoy!

2018CSA_Winter_Feb_17